Programs & Resources

Learn at Home Activities for Word Reading

CVC refers to the consonant, vowel, consonant pattern seen in words like sun, pen, man and hit. This is often referred to as the ‘basic code’ in reading instruction. Basic code refers to the one-to-one relationship between one letter and one sound. The most common sounds for letters are used and the vowels make the short sound. For example, even though the letter "s" can be the sound /z/ in was or has, its basic code sound is the sound /s/. Reading phonetically is referred to as ‘decoding’, so we start by decoding the most basic sounds and combinations of sounds. This is the foundation; students need to feel successful attacking 3 letter words in order to feel confident and apply this skill with new words and in new text.

Activities for Decoding CVC Words

Model: Show the letters moving together while you model blending the sounds together and select the picture of the word that the sounds represent as you blend the sounds faster and eventually say the word. This helps learners understand the concept.

Support: After modeling, have your child practice blending the sounds you say. In this video, the Sesame Street monsters are demonstrating blending a beginning sound onto a word ending, which can be a good place to start if your child is having difficulty blending three sounds together. https://bit.ly/3dA278y Just as the monsters demonstrated their understanding of the word sad, we need to give our learners the opportunity to show that they have made meaning from blending the sounds in the word. Giving two or three pictures to choose from (as shown in the photo above) allows your child to connect the word they have read with its meaning.

Read: Write or build one of the words and have your child say each sound and blend to read the word, then choose the picture card to match what they have read. There are many worksheets available that are like this, but I find it useful to use larger picture cards and movable letters to really be able to demonstrate what we are doing (ie: point to each letter as you/ they say the sound, display letters further apart as you segment but move them together as you blend, physically pick up the card and match to the word rather than drawing lines (which may add unnecessary difficulty to the activity). We have provided slides (near the end of the PowerPoint) with three CVC pictures on each so you have pictures of CVC words for your child to choose from. These can also be printed and cut apart, which may be necessary to target specific skills (discriminating between similar vowel sounds, for example). Click here to download and print

These blending envelopes are useful for learners who tend to look at the first letter and guess the word: the activity shows them how to look at each letter and say its sound one at a time. Model and have them practice blending the first two sounds before showing the third sound to be added. Here is the link to the short e cards; the rest of the vowels are linked at the end of the post.

If your child is confidently and independently blending CVC words, have them try words with consonant digraphs such as ch, th, sh (be sure to present as one unit since the two letters work together to make one sound) and consonant blends such as fl, tr, br, st at the beginning of words and then at the end.

Free Decodable Books Online:

Decodable Word Lists:

Below are lists of words that follow specific patterns in progressively more difficult order. The list is nice to keep handy when working on spelling and reading words with your child. It is also useful when you are trying to write decodable sentences or books for your child to read. Some children are not motivated to read decodable books like the ones listed above. I often create decodable books using the child’s interests (favourite characters from TV and movies, animals, vehicles etc.). You can do a Google search for a picture and create a simple sentence to go with it. No need to print anything; just show the picture and write the sentence on a sentence strip. Or create a PowerPoint with a collection of pictures and decodable sentences you create. It is not necessary for the character names to be decodable; your child will use the picture cue to figure it out.

For example:

Mickey  has  a  big  dog.

Decodable Word Lists

CVC WORDS

ham

yam

Pam

sat

vat

pat

fat

bat

rat

cat

mat

hat

ban

man

pan

ran

tan

van

can

fan

bag

gag

nag

lag

rag

sag

tag

wag

had

tad

dada

pad

bad

mad

fad

sad

lad

jam

ram

Ted

wed

led

fed

bed

red

bet

pet

set

let

net

yet

get

met

wet

jet

hen

ten

den

Ken

pen

men

Ben

pin

win

bin

kin

tin

fin

lit

wit

sit

hit

pit

fit

bit

kit

mop

pop

cop

top

hop

fog

bog

log

dog

jog

hog

got

hot

dot

not

cot

pot

lot

cut

but

gut

rut

nut

hut

mug

jug

hug

dug

rug

bug

tug

nun

pun

run

bun

gun

fun

sun

CVC WORDS with Consonant Digraphs

shed

shin

ship

shot

shut

shun

shop

 

mash

dash

cash

hash

lash

ash

rash

mesh

wish

fish

dish

 

Josh

mush

rush hush

gush

this

than

that

thin

thud

math

bath

path

Beth

with

moth

chip

chap

chat

 

chin

chop

much

such

rich

 

CCVC WORDS

(consonant blend at the beginning of the word)

CVCC WORDS

(consonant blend at the end of the word)

crab

clam

gram

swam

slam

tram

clap

plan

Stan

snap

bran

spat

slat

slap

scat

brat

flat

flag

Glen

Brad

glad

flap

drag

swam

step

fret

fled

bled

Fred

stem

spit

flip

grit

grin

grip

grim

Greg

gram

spin

skin

skip

slid

twin

swim

skid

crib

drip

twig

trip

trap

spot

slot

plot

plop

drop

stop

crop

frog

flop

smog

club

plus

drum

snug

plum

slug

band

land

hand

and

sand

pant

fast

cast

ask mask gasp

mast

past

last

ramp

camp

lamp

damp

land sand hand band

test

nest

west

pest

best

vest

rest

desk belt

help

bent

sent

lent

tent

went

send

bend

mend

end

lend

hint

wind

list

fist

mist

mint

lost

cost

pond

bump

jump

lump

pump

must

rust

bust

dust gust just

hunt

runt

dusk husk tusk

WORDS with consonant digraphs and blends

chest

chant

champ

chest

chomp

chimp

ranch

bench

Inch

pinch

punch

bunch

lunch

munch

thump

theft

fifth

cloth

broth

tenth

shelf

shift

stash

smash

flash

crash

trash

fresh

swish

brush

crush

flush

CCVCC WORDS   (consonant blend at the beginning and end of the word

stand

grand

brand

stamp

slant

blast

craft

plant

grasp

clasp

grant

spent

spend

blend

crept

slept

swept

brisk

crisp

twist

blimp

sprint

print

drift

swift

frost

blond

stump

plump

clump

crust

trust

stunt

grunt

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